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Alcohol injuries

Many Australians drink some alcohol. Excessive alcohol consumption is a major cause of road and other accidents, violence, crime, liver injury and brain damage.

According to the National Drug Household Survey in 2013:

  • About 1 in 5 alcohol drinkers aged 14 or older had put themselves or others at risk of injury or harm while drinking in the previous 12 months. Driving a vehicle under the influence of alcohol was the most common risky activity undertaken. 
  • Over 1 in 4 Australians aged 14 or older had been a victim of an alcohol related incident in 2013. This included many types of abuse, including verbal abuse. 
  • About 4 in 5 Australians aged 14 or over reported they had consumer alcohol in the past year and 6.5% said they consumed alcohol on a daily basis. 
  • Adults aged 18-24 were more likely to binge drink than the rest of the population. Men were more likely to binge drink than women.

Follow the links below to find trusted information about the health effects of alcohol use and injuries resulting from alcohol use.

Last reviewed: July 2016

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Alcohol Consumption: Short-Term Health Consequences | myVMC

As the amount of alcohol consumed in a single sitting is increased, the BAC increases proportionately. Once the BAC has surpassed 0.05%, inhibitions are reduced and judgement and movement are impaired.

Read more on myVMC – Virtual Medical Centre website

Alcohol

Information about alcohol-related health issues and Australian Government policy.

Read more on Department of Health website

Key facts FASD Alcohol AOD Knowledge Centre Australian Indigenous Alcohol and Other Drugs Knowledge Centre

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a diagnostic term used to describe the range of mental and physical effects on the developing unborn baby that are caused by drinking alcohol during pregnancy

Read more on Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet website

You and alcohol

Alcohol is a drug that acts as a depressant and slows down the brain and nervous system. It is the most widely used drug in Australia.

Read more on Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service website

Alcohol and withdrawal - OnTrack

OnTrack offers online psychology services such as free online treatment programs, information and facts about mental and physical health, information and advice on where to get help and access to quizzes with immediate feedback.

Read more on OnTrack website

Alcohol hangovers | myVMC

An alcohol hangover refers to the mental, emotional and physical symptoms which an individual experiences after they have consumed alcohol. A hangover occurs when the person has recovered from the intoxicating effects of alcohol that is, when the body has metabolised or processed the alcohol consumed and is sober.

Read more on myVMC – Virtual Medical Centre website

Alcohol: The health, social, and financial burden | myVMC

Various cultures may have very different attitudes, beliefs, norms and expectancies about drinking and this is reflected in the behaviours of their drinkers. In Western societies, beliefs about alcohol are inconsistent and sometimes negative and therefore alcohol is associated with problems such as anti-social and violent behaviour. That said, alcohol-related problems are associated with excessive drinking in any culture. In general, the majority of people consume alcohol in moderation.

Read more on myVMC – Virtual Medical Centre website

Ageing with alcohol - ADF - Alcohol & Drug Foundation

Alcohol use at the older end of the life span receives little attention, and less is known about the factors that influence alcohol use by older people.

Read more on Alcohol and Drug Foundation website

National Alcohol Guidelines

The most recent version of the Australian Guidelines to Reduce Health Risks from Drinking Alcohol was released by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) in 2009

Read more on NOFASD - National Organisation for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder website

Alcohol recommendations

The National Guidelines for Alcohol Consumption recommend limiting alcohol intake to no more than 2.0 standard drinks per day for men and women.

Read more on Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute website

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