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Spinal cord injuries

Spinal cord injuries are most commonly caused by trauma including motor vehicle accidents, falls, diving, and acts of violence. Sports-related spinal cord injuries occur more commonly in children and teenagers, while work-related injuries (especially from construction work) predominate in adults.

Spinal cord injuries may result in paralysis including quadriplegia (a loss of function below the neck) and paraplegia (a loss of function below the chest). The spinal cord does not need to be completely severed to cause off of function. Compression of the spinal cord or bruising or inflammation can also cause loss of function.

Follow the links below to find trusted information about spinal cord injuries.

Last reviewed: October 2016

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Spinal Cord Injury Pain

Pain is common after spinal cord injury, with up to 70% of people experiencing pain for more than 6 months. This website will give you a better understanding of SCI pain. You will hear directly from people in pain about helpful strategies, tools and resources to help you learn pain management skills. If your healthcare providers have questions about SCI pain. direct them to the SCI Pain Navigator for further information

Read more on ACI Pain Management Network website

Understanding Pain after Spinal Cord Injury

In this episode you will learn more about why pain occurs after spinal cord injury and why this pain is unique. You will learn about what causes the different types of pain and why a range of strategies are needed to effectively target pain.

Read more on ACI Pain Management Network website

Nutrition for adults with Spinal Cord Injuries

After a Spinal Cord Injury (SCI), quadriplegia in particular, the energy requirements of the body decline and the metabolism becomes sluggish due to insulin resistance. It is very easy to gain weight if eating habits do not change. Being overweight and having a SCI impact s on many important factors such as, skin integrity, equipment (eg. wheelchair, hoist), bladder & bowel management, mobility, transferring, dressing and independence. People with SCI have a greater tendency to heart disease and diabetes. Being overweight and drinking excessive amounts of alcohol increases the risks further.

Read more on ACI - Agency for Clinical Innovation website

Talking to Your Children about Spinal Cord Injury: A Practical Guide for Families.

As social workers in the spinal cord injury (SCI) fi eld we acknowledge that there has been a gap in services, resources and support for parents and families to explain their injury to children. Parents engaged in NSW Spinal Services provided informal feedback regarding the lack of specifi c resources available to them to assist their child relatives through the impact of spinal cord injury on their family.

Read more on ACI - Agency for Clinical Innovation website

Introduction to Spinal Cord Injury and Chronic Pain

In this episode you will learn about chronic pain after SCI. You will learn about the many different types of pain, and how to identify the type of pain that you have. You will also learn about managing pain flare ups and recognising warning signs.

Read more on ACI Pain Management Network website

Spinal Cord Injury - Be active Kids with Spinal Cord Injury | The Sydney Children's Hospitals Network

Read more on Sydney Children's Hospitals Network website

Spinal Cord Injury - Reintegration to School after Spinal Cord Injury | The Sydney Children's Hospitals Network

Read more on Sydney Children's Hospitals Network website

Spinal Cord Injury - Hospital admissions and Spinal Cord Injury | The Sydney Children's Hospitals Network

Read more on Sydney Children's Hospitals Network website

Spinal Cord Injury - Be active Adolescents with Spinal Cord Injury | The Sydney Children's Hospitals Network

Read more on Sydney Children's Hospitals Network website

Spinal Cord Injury - Starting School and Spinal Cord Injury | The Sydney Children's Hospitals Network

Read more on Sydney Children's Hospitals Network website

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