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Viral haemorrhagic fevers

Viral haemorrhagic fever is a rare but sometimes severe illness and is potentially life threatening. It is not a single condition, but a group of conditions caused by different viruses. These viruses include:

Dengue fever is the only viral haemorrhagic fever known to occur in Australia.

Follow the links below to find trusted information about viral haemorrhagic fevers.

Last reviewed: April 2017

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Viral haemorrhagic fevers - including symptoms, treatment and prevention :: SA Health

Viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) are a group of potentially life threatening infections which are associated with fever and bleeding.

Read more on SA Health website

Ebola virus disease (EVD) | Better Health Channel

Read more on Better Health Channel website

Ebola virus disease (EVD) - Alerts

On 9 June the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the end of the most recent outbreak of Ebola virus disease in Liberia.

Read more on NSW Health website

Ebola virus disease

Read more on Queensland Health website

Ebola

Information about Ebola virus disease (Ebola), outbreaks and preparedness.

Read more on Department of Health website

Dengue fever - myDr.com.au

Dengue is a viral infection transmitted by mosquitoes in tropical areas, including north Queensland. Most people recover fully, but the severe form - dengue haemorrhagic fever - can be fatal.

Read more on myDr website

Yellow fever

Yellow fever is a viral disease which causes bleeding, jaundice, kidney and liver failure and which is primarily spread by mosquitoes.

Read more on WA Health website

Dengue

Dengue virus is spread by two types of mosquitoes that prefer to live indoors. Travellers are at risk if they visit an area that has the dengue mosquito.

Read more on NSW Health website

Dengue

Read more on Queensland Health website

Prevent mosquito-borne disease on holiday overseas

In some overseas countries, mosquitoes can transmit serious and potentially fatal diseases such as dengue, malaria and Japanese encephalitis. It is important to visit your GP at least 6 weeks prior to traveling overseas to determine any health risks associated with your destination.

Read more on WA Health website

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