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Breast cancer often uses different combinations of treatment.

Breast cancer often uses different combinations of treatment.
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Breast cancer symptoms

The first symptom of breast cancer most women notice is a lump or an area of thickened tissue in their breast. Most lumps (90%) are not cancerous, but it is always best to have them checked by your doctor.

See your doctor if you notice any of the following:

  • a lump or area of thickened tissue in either breast
  • a change in the size or shape of one or both breasts
  • discharge from either of your nipples (which may be streaked with blood)
  • a lump or swelling in either of your armpits
  • dimpling on the skin of your breasts
  • a rash on or around your nipple
  • a change in the appearance of your nipple, such as becoming sunken into your breast
  • pain in either of your breasts or armpits not related to your period.

Learn more about how to be breast cancer aware.

Last reviewed: September 2016

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Found 505 results

Breast Lumps and Lesions | myVMC

Breast lumps are a very common complaint for women of all ages, they may occur spontaneously or gradually and be accompanied by other symptoms such as breast pain, changes in the skin or changes in the nipple.

Read more on myVMC – Virtual Medical Centre website

Breast Cancer (Carcinoma of the Breast) | myVMC

Carcinoma of the breast is the most common breast cancer in women. It originates in milk ducts or glandular tissues. Breast lumps are a common symptoms.

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Breast Cancer (Inflammatory Carcinoma of the Breast) | myVMC

Inflammatory cancer of the breast is a rare type of breast cancer which spread rapidly. It causes red, inflamed skin on the breast, not lumps in the breast.

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Breast health and breast cancer prevention video | myVMC

Breast health is more than preventing breast cancer. Regular mammograms and feeling for lumps is important, as is a properly fitting bra and healthy eating.

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Breast Cancer: The risks, signs & symptoms, screening and how to assess your own breasts | myVMC

Professor Christobel Saunders explains breast cancer risks, signs & symptoms, screening and how to assess your own breasts.

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How can I look out for breast cancer?

A womans breasts change throughout life. Being aware of these changes and learning how your breasts feel at different times can help you understand what is normal for you. If you are familiar with your breasts you may be more likely to notice any unusual changes that could be a sign of breast cancer.

Read more on WA Health website

What is locally advanced breast cancer? | Cancer Australia

Locally advanced breast cancer is invasive breast cancer that has one or more of the following features: may be large (typically bigger than 5 cm) may have spread to several lymph nodes in the armpit (axilla) or other areas near the breast may have spread to other tissues around the breast such as the skin, muscle or ribs. However, there are no signs that the cancer has spread beyond the breast region or to other parts of the body.

Read more on Cancer Australia website

Breast cancer

Breast cancer is the growth of abnormal cells in the breast. These cells can invade the breast and surrounding tissue and spread to other parts of the body.

Read more on WA Health website

Anxiety, depression and breast cancer

Anxiety and depression are common in women with breast cancer, but they are often overlooked and, therefore, undertreated.

Read more on beyondblue website

What are the risk factors for breast cancer?

The cause of breast cancer is still unknown, however research has identified a number of factors that increase the chances (risk) of developing breast cancer.

Read more on WA Health website

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