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Talking about dementia

2-minute read

A diagnosis of dementia can be very stressful for the person diagnosed, and for their family and carer. Telling a person they have dementia is difficult, and must be handled in a sensitive, calm and dignified way.

The person with dementia has the right to know about their diagnosis, especially if they are diagnosed at an early stage of the disease. However, they also have a right not to know their diagnosis if that is their clear preference.

If you are a carer, friend or family member, you may need to explain:

  • why they are getting their symptoms
  • what type of dementia they have
  • possible treatments for their symptoms
  • what services are available to give them help and support.

Sometimes the person with dementia may not understand all it means to have the condition. This is where a family member or carer may need to make some judgements about what the person would want. For example, they may have indicated in the past what they would prefer should this type of situation arise.

Some doctors will always tell their patient about their diagnosis, so it is important to discuss the issue before the doctor visits. It might help to talk with family and friends, and the person’s doctor, beforehand.

Visit the Alzheimer’s Australia website to find out more, or call the National Dementia Helpline on 1800 100 500 for information and support.

Dementia and shared decision-making - expert advice

When a diagnosis of dementia is made, it is important to start thinking about the future. Next steps for the person with dementia need to be discussed with a doctor and close family members. This video provides some important points for the future to consider.


Read the related video transcript

Last reviewed: January 2017

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Dementia Australia | Talking about your dementia

Anyone receiving a piece of news, whether good or bad, has to decide who with, and when to share the information. In some cases, these decisions may be very straightforward. However, when the news is a diagnosis of dementia it is common for people to spend a lot more time considering who among their family and friends to tell, and when.This page suggests some things to consider when talking about your diagnosis.

Read more on Dementia Australia website

Dementia Australia | Talking about your dementia

Anyone receiving a piece of news, whether good or bad, has to decide who with, and when to share the information. In some cases, these decisions may be very straightforward. However, when the news is a diagnosis of dementia it is common for people to spend a lot more time considering who among their family and friends to tell, and when.This page suggests some things to consider when talking about your diagnosis.

Read more on Dementia Australia website

Dementia Australia | Dementia language guidelines

The purpose of this paper is to promote the consistent use of appropriate, inclusive and non stigmatising language when talking or writing about dementia and people living with dementia. What is appropriate language for talking about dementia and why do we need it? Read, download or listen to the full language guidelines PDF file here. Or read the summary below.

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Dementia Australia | Dementia language guidelines

The purpose of this paper is to promote the consistent use of appropriate, inclusive and non stigmatising language when talking or writing about dementia and people living with dementia. What is appropriate language for talking about dementia and why do we need it? Read, download or listen to the full language guidelines PDF file here. Or read the summary below.

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This section talks about how dementia affects a persons behaviour and how as a carer or a family member we can cope with managing this behavioural change. Behaviour changes Dementia affects people in different ways.Common behaviour changes that may occur when a person has dementia, and whythese changes occur are explained under the behaviour changes section.

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