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Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair (TAPP)

4-minute read

This page will give you information about a laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair (TAPP - transabdominal preperitoneal). If you have any questions, you should ask your GP or other relevant health professional.

What is an inguinal hernia?

Your abdominal cavity contains your intestines and other structures. These are protected by your abdominal wall, which is made up of four layers.

Weak spots can develop in the layer of muscle, resulting in the contents of your abdomen, along with the inner layer, pushing through your abdominal wall. This produces a lump called a hernia.

An inguinal hernia happens at the inguinal canal. This is a narrow passage through your abdominal wall.

Illustration showing a laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair  (TAPP).
A laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair (TAPP).

What are the benefits of surgery?

You should no longer have the hernia. Surgery should prevent the serious complications that a hernia can cause and allow you to return to normal activities.

Are there any alternatives to surgery?

You can sometimes control the hernia with a truss (padded support belt) or simply leave it alone. It will not get better without surgery.

What does the operation involve?

The operation is performed under a general anaesthetic and usually takes about 30 minutes (less than an hour for a repair to both sides).

Your surgeon will make a small cut on or near your umbilicus (belly button) so they can insert an instrument in your abdominal cavity to inflate it with gas (carbon dioxide). They will make two small cuts on your abdomen so they can insert tubes (ports) into your abdomen. Your surgeon will insert surgical instruments through the ports along with a telescope so they can see inside your abdomen and perform the operation.

Your surgeon will return the part of your abdomen that is causing the hernia, and insert a synthetic mesh to cover the weak spot.

What complications can happen?

Some complications can be serious and can even cause death.

General complications of any operation

  • pain
  • bleeding
  • infection of the surgical site (wound)
  • unsightly scarring of your skin
  • blood clot in your leg
  • blood clot in your lung

Specific complications of this operation

Keyhole surgery complications

  • damage to structures such as your bowel, bladder or blood vessels
  • developing a hernia
  • injury to your bowel
  • surgical emphysema

Hernia repair complications

  • developing a collection of blood (haematoma) or fluid (seroma) at the site of the original hernia
  • continued discomfort or pain in your groin
  • for men, discomfort or pain in your testicle on the side of the operation
  • for men, difficulty passing urine
  • for men, damage to the blood supply of your testicle

How soon will I recover?

You should be able to go home the same day or the day after.

You may return to normal activities when you feel comfortable to do so, usually after a week.

Do not play sports or do strenuous exercise for 3 weeks.

Regular exercise should help you to return to normal activities as soon as possible. Before you start exercising, ask the healthcare team or your GP for advice.

Most people make a full recovery and can return to normal activities.

The hernia can come back many years later and you may need another operation.

Summary

An inguinal hernia is a common condition caused by a weakness in your abdominal wall, near the inguinal canal. If left untreated, an inguinal hernia can cause serious complications.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION
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Last reviewed: September 2019


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