Healthdirect Free Australian health advice you can count on.

Medical problem? Call 1800 022 222. If you need urgent medical help, call triple zero immediately

healthdirect Australia is a free service where you can talk to a nurse or doctor who can help you know what to do.

beginning of content

Anal injury

Injuries to the anal region are often the result of changes in bowel function.

For example, pain and irritation can result from excessive diarrhoea or constipation, causing trauma to the skin of the anal region from overexposure to digestive juices, excessive toilet paper use or passing of hardened stool (poo). These injuries may lead to pain and tenderness, and sometimes bright red blood spotting on toilet paper or in the toilet bowl.

Sometimes the muscles in and around the anal region go into spasm, and this can lead to a tightening of the sphincter that makes passing stool painful. It can also cause a tear, which can bleed.

Anal injuries can also be caused by sexual activity involving insertion of objects, fingers or a penis through the anus and into the rectum. Friction, sharp edges, or rough behaviour can tear the sensitive skin and lining of the rectum, causing pain, inflammation and bleeding.

Any injury that causes large amounts of blood loss, persistent pain and inflammation, or the lodging of a foreign object inside the rectum must be seen by a doctor.

Check your symptoms with healthdirect’s Symptom Checker to get advice on when to seek medical attention.

If an object, such as a sex toy, is still in place, it needs to be removed urgently by a doctor. Go to the nearest emergency department (ED).

You must not try to remove the foreign body by yourself, or allow anybody else present to try – removal may cause more damage if it is done by someone who is not medically trained. Likewise, it is vital that the object is not left inside the rectum for any period of time because it can damage the lining of the rectum and other internal organs.

If the anal area is extremely painful and swollen, a cold compress or covered ice pack, such as a bag of frozen peas wrapped in a clean towel, may be used to relieve the pain and swelling. Do not keep the ice pack on the area for more than 30 minutes.

Protect the area while seeking medical attention so that you don’t cause any further damage to the surrounding areas.

If you are in pain, get advice on pain relief medicines you can take.

If any pain or bleeding from the anal area is associated with sex, stop sex and abstain until reviewed by a doctor. Any anal sex in the presence of broken or damaged skin can increase the risk of transmission of HIV or sexually transmitted infections (STIs). It can also lead to further damage of the area.

You should call triple zero (000) and ask for an ambulance if you:

Suspicion of deliberate injury

If there is any suspicion that the injury was not the result of an accident and that it was deliberately inflicted, you should seek help from a healthcare professional as soon as possible. This could be a nurse or doctor at an emergency department or a doctor’s surgery, or a health visitor or school nurse.

You can also search for local services and agencies that can offer confidential advice in the National Health Services Directory.

Not sure what to do next?

If you are still concerned about your anus, why not use healthdirect’s online Symptom Checker to get advice on when to seek medical attention.

The Symptom Checker guides you to the next appropriate healthcare steps, whether it’s self care, talking to a health professional, going to a hospital or calling triple zero (000).

Last reviewed: July 2015

Need more information?

These trusted information partners have more on this topic.

Found 7 results

Crohn's disease - myDr.com.au

Crohn's disease is a long-term inflammatory condition that affects the gastrointestinal tract. Most cases of Crohn's disease are diagnosed between the ages of about 15 and 30.

Read more on myDr website

Proctosedyl Suppositories - myDr.com.au

Proctosedyl Suppositories - Consumer Medicines Information leaflets of prescription and over-the-counter medicines

Read more on myDr – Consumer Medicine Information website

Faecal incontinence in children (encopresis) - myDr.com.au

Children with encopresis are not soiling their underwear deliberately, and they should receive medical help.

Read more on myDr website

Constipation: causes and symptoms - myDr.com.au

What is constipation? Find out about symptoms, causes, risk factors and diagnosis. Plus, when you should seek medical advice.

Read more on myDr website

Petrus Bisacodyl Suppositories - myDr.com.au

Petrus Bisacodyl Suppositories - Consumer Medicines Information leaflets of prescription and over-the-counter medicines

Read more on myDr – Consumer Medicine Information website

Proctosedyl Ointment - myDr.com.au

Proctosedyl Ointment - Consumer Medicines Information leaflets of prescription and over-the-counter medicines

Read more on myDr – Consumer Medicine Information website

Budenofalk Foam Enema - myDr.com.au

Budenofalk Foam Enema - Consumer Medicines Information leaflets of prescription and over-the-counter medicines

Read more on myDr – Consumer Medicine Information website

Check your symptoms Find a health service

Healthdirect 24hr 7 days a week hotline

24 hour health advice and information you can count on

1800 022 222

Government Accredited with over 140 information partners

We are a government-funded service, providing quality, approved health information

Australian Government, health department logo ACT Government logo New South Wales government, health department logo Northen Territory Government logo Government of South Australia, health department logo Tasmanian government logo Government of Western Australia, health department logo
Feedback