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Boy getting ready for vaccination
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Vaccine preventable diseases

Hepatitis A

Trusted information about Hepatitis A, including common symptoms, how long time it takes for the virus to develop and how to help prevent hepatitis A.

Vaccination is safe and effective in protecting against hepatitis B.

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B can lead to liver damage over time. If it turns out you have hepatitis B, it is important to protect others from infection. Find out how.

School-age girl receiving HPV vaccine injection.

HPV vaccine

The Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) can be prevented by vaccination. There are 2 doses given free to both girls and boys aged 12-13 years, ideally before ...

Lyssavirus is carried by bats in Australia.

Lyssavirus (ABLV)

Find out about Australian bat Lyssavirus, and learn how it can be prevented if you are bitten or scratched by a bat.

Measles

Measles is a highly infectious viral disease, spread from person to person via droplets in the air. Learn about the symptoms and why vaccination is es...

Meningococcal disease.

Meningococcal disease

Meningococcal disease is a serious infection caused by Meningococcus bacteria. It can develop quickly, and it can be fatal. Learn about the bacteria a...

Mumps is most common in children.

Mumps

Mumps is a contagious viral infection, most common in children between 5 and 15 years. These days it’s rare thanks to effective immunisation.

Mild fever of 38 degrees C or more is a common symptom of rubella.

Rubella (German measles)

Rubella (also known as German measles) is best prevented by the MMR vaccination. Learn more about its distinctive rash, other symptoms and treatments.

Shingles

Shingles is a painful rash caused by the chickenpox virus. Here's how to recognise the symptoms and find the treatment that's best for you.

You can catch tetanus if you have an open wound.

Tetanus

Tetanus is an infection that can be fatal. Because of immunisation, few people now get tetanus in Australia. Find out more about tetanus on our truste...

Treatment of tuberculosis requires a combination of medicines.

Tuberculosis

This highly infectious disease, which mostly affects the lungs, can be spread through coughing, sneezing, speaking or even singing.

Whooping cough is serious in babies under 12 months old.

Whooping cough

Whooping cough is a contagious bacterial infection and is most serious in babies. Here’s how to spot the symptoms and protect infants.

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Communicable diseases | Australian Government Department of Health

Communicable diseases are diseases that can spread from person to person. Find out what were doing to prevent outbreaks and monitor these diseases in Australia.

Read more on Department of Health website

Community (herd) immunity | Australian Government Department of Health

If enough people in a community are immunised against an infectious disease, there is less of the disease in the community, which makes it harder for the disease to spread. Immunisation protects both people who are vaccinated and also helps the entire community. It helps protect those who are too young to be vaccinated and those who cant be vaccinated for medical reasons.

Read more on Department of Health website

Polio (poliomyelitis) | Australian Government Department of Health

Polio is a contagious disease, spread by close contact with an infected person. Symptoms include fever and headaches. Polio can affect people of all ages but can be prevented with vaccination. Due to immunisation, polio is very rare in Australia.

Read more on Department of Health website

Rotavirus | Australian Government Department of Health

Rotavirus is a highly contagious disease, spread by close contact with an infected person. Symptoms include severe diarrhoea and vomiting. Rotavirus can be prevented with immunisation and attention to hand washing. There is no treatment for rotavirus except for rest and drinking plenty of fluids.

Read more on Department of Health website

Vaccine preventable disease in Australia | Australian Government Department of Health

Vaccination against a range of bacterial and viral diseases is an essential part of controlling contagious diseases not just in Australia, but also world-wide.If enough people in the community are immunised, the infection can no longer be spread from person to person and the disease can die out altogether.Vaccination is a safe and effective way of giving protection against

Read more on Department of Health website

Whooping cough (pertussis) | Australian Government Department of Health

Whooping cough is a highly contagious disease. Symptoms that include fever and long periods of coughing that sound like a whoop. Whooping cough can affect people of all ages but it is more serious for babies. Whooping cough can be prevented by immunisation. Treatment includes antibiotics.

Read more on Department of Health website

Flu (influenza) | Australian Government Department of Health

Influenza (the flu) is a highly contagious disease, usually prevented by vaccination and treated by managing symptoms. Spread by body fluids from infected people, symptoms include a runny nose and sore throat. Flu can affect anyone but is especially serious for babies and older people.

Read more on Department of Health website

Immunisation Coalition | Kids - Immunisation Coalition

Find out how to protect your kids from infectious diseases. Keep up to date with the Childhood National Immunisation Program schedule.

Read more on Immunisation Coalition website

Diphtheria - myDr.com.au

Diphtheria is an infectious disease, which usually affects the upper respiratory tract. Onset of respiratory diphtheria is gradual, with symptoms such as mild fever, sore throat, fatigue and hoarse voice.

Read more on myDr website

Hib (Haemophilus influenzae type b) | Australian Government Department of Health

Hib (Haemophilus influenzae type b) is a contagious disease, caught by contact with fluids from an infected person. Symptoms include fever and a severe headache. Hib can affect people of all ages, but can be prevented with vaccination. Treatment includes antibiotics, usually in hospital.

Read more on Department of Health website

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