Healthdirect Free Australian health advice you can count on.

Medical problem? Call 1800 022 222. If you need urgent medical help, call triple zero immediately

healthdirect Australia is a free service where you can talk to a nurse or doctor who can help you know what to do.

beginning of content

Retinal diseases

1-minute read

The retina is a collection of light sensitive nerve cells at the back of the eyeball.

Retinal disorders damage these delicate cells and reduce someone’s ability to see. ‘Macular degeneration’ is damage to the centre of the retina where colour is seen. Treatments aim to slow or halt damage depending on the cause. Follow the links below to find trusted information about retinal diseases.

Last reviewed: February 2014

Need more information?

These trusted information partners have more on this topic.

Top results

Retinal Detachment | myVMC

Retinal detachment refers to an eye condition in which the eyes retina becomes detached from the vitreous fluid and layers of tissue that surround and support it

Read more on myVMC – Virtual Medical Centre website

Retinoschisis (eye disease) information | myVMC

Retinoschisis occurs when the eye's retina splits into two layers. It causes gradual visual loss and may lead to retinal detachment.

Read more on myVMC – Virtual Medical Centre website

Retinal detachment - detached retina

Retinal detachment (detached retina) is a medical emergency when the retina becomes separated from the inside of the eye.  Warning signs include a sudden increase in floaters or flashes. Seek immediate medical attention. This could save your sight.

Read more on myDr website

Retinal detachment - Better Health Channel

If a detached retina is not treated, it can lead to total blindness.

Read more on Better Health Channel website

Retinitis pigmentosa

The retina is located at the back of the eye. This thin layer of light-sensitive cells sends information on shape, colour, pattern and movement to the brain via the optic nerve. There are special light sensing cells in the retina, called rods and cones (see explanation below).

Read more on Better Health Channel website

Retinitis Pigmentosa | Vision Australia.

Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) is a genetic eye condition that causes cells in the light-sensitive retina, located at the back of the eye, to degenerate slowly and progressively.

Read more on Vision Australia website

Cardiovascular Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease

Cardiovascular disease includes all diseases and conditions of the heart and blood vessels, such as arteries and veins.

Read more on Kidney Health Australia website

Peripheral vascular disease

Peripheral vascular disease is the reduced circulation of blood to a body part other than the brain or heart. It is caused by a narrowed or blocked blood vessel. The main cause is atherosclerosis, which is the build-up of fatty deposits that narrow a blood vessel, usually an artery. The narrowed blood vessel reduces the circulation of blood to the associated body part.

Read more on Better Health Channel website

Coronary heart disease (CHD) and heart failure information | myVMC

Coronary heart disease is caused by narrowing of the blood vessels of the heart. It results in heart failure, heart attack and/or unstable angina.

Read more on myVMC – Virtual Medical Centre website

Degos Disease - ACD

Degos disease is a rare progressive condition affecting blood vessels. This causes disease in the skin, gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system.

Read more on Australasian College of Dermatologists website

Healthdirect 24hr 7 days a week hotline

24 hour health advice and information you can count on

1800 022 222

Government Accredited with over 140 information partners

We are a government-funded service, providing quality, approved health information

Australian Government, health department logo ACT Government logo New South Wales government, health department logo Northen Territory Government logo Government of South Australia, health department logo Tasmanian government logo Government of Western Australia, health department logo