Healthdirect Free Australian health advice you can count on.

Medical problem? Call 1800 022 222. If you need urgent medical help, call triple zero immediately

healthdirect Australia is a free service where you can talk to a nurse or doctor who can help you know what to do.

beginning of content

Oestrogen blood test

2-minute read

Many women at some time have a blood test for oestrogen. It might be during pregnancy (or if a woman is having difficulty getting pregnant), if their menstrual cycle is unusual, if the woman is showing the signs of menopause or for some other reason.

What is being tested?

Oestrogen is a sex hormone produced both by women and men, although in much greater amounts in women.

Oestrogen helps the female sex organs — the ovaries, fallopian tubes, uterus and the vagina — to grow and mature. It also helps create other female characteristics, such as the breasts.

Oestrogen levels rise naturally during puberty and fall after menopause.

Your doctor might look for 3 types of oestrogen in your blood:

  • oestradiol — important for ovulation, conception, pregnancy, healthy bones and cholesterol levels in women
  • oestriol — important during pregnancy; oestriol levels usually start to rise after the eighth week of pregnancy
  • oestrone — the most important oestrogen after menopause

Why would I need this test?

Your doctor might suggest a blood test for oestrogen if:

  • your menstrual cycle is abnormal, or you have heavy bleeding
  • you can't get pregnant
  • you have symptoms of menopause, like hot flushes
  • you have symptoms that might mean your hormones are unbalanced

If you are pregnant, you might have a blood test for oestrogen:

Young girls occasionally have blood tests for oestrogen if they are developing sex organs when very young. Young boys occasionally have blood tests for oestrogen if they are developing breasts.

How would you prepare for this test?

You don't have to do anything special before a blood test for oestrogen.

Understanding your results

The levels of each type of oestrogen in your blood can be different from day to day. The can also vary throughout your pregnancy. They can change as you get older too.

So, a one-off test is only a guide. You might need several tests over weeks or months to check what is really happening with your oestrogen levels.

A result outside the normal range might not mean you have a health problem, or that you need to be worried. Your doctor is the best person to talk to about your blood test results.

More information

Learn more here about the development and quality assurance of healthdirect content.

Last reviewed: June 2020


Back To Top

Need more information?

These trusted information partners have more on this topic.

Top results

Oestradiol - Pathology Tests Explained

Why and when to get tested for oestrogens

Read more on Pathology Tests Explained website

Sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) - Pathology Tests Explained

Why and when to get tested for SHBG

Read more on Pathology Tests Explained website

Navigating perimenopause

Perimenopause can be a time of hormonal fluctuations, but there are positive ways to find relief.

Read more on Jean Hailes for Women's Health website

Obesity and hormones - Better Health Channel

betterhealth.vic.gov.au

Read more on Better Health Channel website

Fibrinogen - Pathology Tests Explained

Explains how fibrinogen is used; when fibrinogen is used; what the results of fibrinogen might mean

Read more on Pathology Tests Explained website

ACD A-Z of Skin - Spider Naevi

Spider naevi are prominent blood vessels affecting up to 10% of the population. They usually occur as single or multiple blood vessels on the face, chest and neck areas.

Read more on Australasian College of Dermatologists website

Fact Sheets – Bone Health

Fact Sheets Popular Factsheets - Calcium, Vitamin D, Exercise, Treatment Calcium and Bone Health A small amount of calcium is absorbed into the blood and used for the healthy functioning of the heart, muscles, blood and nerves

Read more on Healthy Bones Australia website

Prolactin - Pathology Tests Explained

Describes how prolactin testing is used, when prolactin testing is done, and what the results of prolactin testing might mean.

Read more on Pathology Tests Explained website

Deep vein thrombosis - MyDr.com.au

Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) occurs when a blood clot forms in the deep veins of the leg. Find out about symptoms, causes, treatment and prevention.

Read more on myDr website

von Willebrand disease - MyDr.com.au

Find out about Von Willebrand disease, an inherited bleeding disorder that affects up to one in 100 people.

Read more on myDr website

Healthdirect 24hr 7 days a week hotline

24 hour health advice you can count on

1800 022 222

Government Accredited with over 140 information partners

We are a government-funded service, providing quality, approved health information and advice

Australian Government, health department logo ACT Government logo New South Wales government, health department logo Northen Territory Government logo Government of South Australia, health department logo Tasmanian government logo Victorian government logo Government of Western Australia, health department logo

Healthdirect Australia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of Country throughout Australia and their continuing connection to land, sea and community. We pay our respects to the Traditional Owners and to Elders both past and present.