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Mumps prevention

2-minute read

In Australia, children are immunised against mumps. The vaccine is given in combination with the measles and rubella vaccine. This is known as the 'MMR' vaccine.

Your child will receive the first immunisation dose of MMR at 12 months and a second dose at 18 months (MMRV). Immunising your child with these two doses gives your child immunity against mumps in approximately 95% of cases.

Visit the Department of Health website to see the National Immunisation Program Schedule.

If you weren’t vaccinated against mumps as a child, or if you’re not sure whether you are vaccinated, talk to your doctor about whether you need a catch-up vaccine.

Mumps vaccine

Vaccination is your best protection against mumps. This table explains how the vaccine is given, who should get it, and whether it is on the National Immunisation Program Schedule. Some diseases can be prevented with different vaccines, so talk to your doctor about which one is appropriate for you.

What age is it recommended?

At 12 months and 18 months.

Anyone older who has not had 2 doses of the vaccine previously.

How many doses are required? 2
How is it administered? Injection
Is it free?

Free for children at 12 and 18 months, and at 4 if they didn’t receive both doses.

Free for people under 20 years old, refugees and other humanitarian entrants of any age.

For everyone else, there is a cost for this vaccine.

Find out more on the Department of Health website and the National Immunisation Program Schedule, and ask your doctor if you are eligible for additional free vaccines based on your situation or location.

Common side effects The vaccine is very safe. Possible side effects include fever, rash and feeling unwell.

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Last reviewed: April 2019

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