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Girl scratching her arm.

Girl scratching her arm.
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Itchy skin

5-minute read

What is itchy skin?

Itching is a common irritation of the skin that makes you want to scratch the itchy area. It can occur anywhere on the body and can be very frustrating and uncomfortable.

Itching may occur on a small part of the body, for example around the area of an insect bite, or it can affect the whole body such as an allergic reaction.

What causes itchy skin?

Here are some common causes of itchy skin, with their related symptoms.

Dry skin: Skin can become dry and itchy in hot or cold, dry weather, or from using soap. Dry skin looks flaky and rough but it isn’t usually itchy or red. Sometimes the skin can crack, which can be painful.

Insect bite: There will usually be a bump or blister around the bite. The area may be inflamed and swollen.

Hives: Hives or urticaria are raised, white pink or red spots that are very itchy. The rash is often on the chest, abdomen or back, but it can appear anywhere. The rash will last from a few hours to 24 hours and then disappear with no scarring.

Heat rash: Heat rash looks like little pink or red spots or blisters. They can appear anywhere on the skin. Heat rash, also called miliaria or prickly heat, is very common in babies.

Eczema: Eczema causes itchy, red, scaly patches on the skin. The patches are usually on the cheeks, elbow creases and behind the knees. Eczema is common in children and often runs in families who have conditions like allergies, hay fever or asthma. Eczema is also called atopic dermatitis.

Scabies: Scabies is an extremely itchy skin rash caused by small mites. There will be red lumps and threadlike tracks on the skin. These usually appear between the fingers and toes, on the insides of the wrists, in the armpits, around the tummy and groin or on the buttocks.

Psoriasis: Psoriasis causes thick red, scaly patches on the skin. The scales can be silvery white. The patches are often on the scalp, knees, elbows, belly button and between the buttocks.

Obstetric cholestasis: This is an uncommon condition which usually occurs in the last four months of pregnancy. It can cause generalised (all over) itching of the skin, usually without a rash. The whole of the body may be affected, including the palms of the hands and the soles of the feet. You usually have itching but no rash.

CHECK YOUR SYMPTOMS — Use our rashes and skin problems Symptom Checker and find out if you need to seek medical help.

When should I see my doctor?

It’s always a good idea to see a doctor if your baby develops a rash. Other reasons to see a doctor are:

  • the lips or tongue are swollen
  • you or your child have trouble breathing
  • you are unwell or have a fever
  • the symptoms keep coming back
  • the itching is so bad you can’t sleep
  • the rash is bleeding, scabs or has pus
  • you develop severe itching while you are pregnant

Sometimes itching with no rash can be the sign of a more serious medical problem. See your doctor if you are very itchy and there is no rash.

How is itchy skin treated?

If you’re experiencing itching, here are some things that may help:

  • Try not to scratch the area. Keep your nails short to prevent breaking the skin if you do scratch. A cool bath or shower may help provide short-term relief, but excessive showering or bathing may make it worse.
  • After a bath or shower gently pat yourself dry with a clean towel. Do not rub or use the towel to scratch yourself.
  • Do not use any soaps, shower gels or foam bath products as they can dry the skin and make the itching worse.
  • Try to wear loose cotton clothing which can help prevent you overheating and making the itch worse. Avoid fabrics which irritate your skin like wool or scratchy fabrics.

Your pharmacist may be able to recommend some products which can help with itchy skin.

Can itchy skin be prevented?

To prevent itchy skin, use moisturiser after a shower or bath, while your skin is still damp. Make sure you have quick showers and don’t have the water too hot.

Drinking lots of water to keep well hydrated and using a humidifier in dry weather can help.

You can also use a mild soap or a non-soap cleanser to prevent itchy skin.

Complications of itchy skin

It's quite common to find that after you’ve scratched an itch that it becomes more persistent (itchier) and you get into a cycle of itching and scratching. This can be painful and can sometimes lead to an infection if the skin is broken.

The scratching can also lead to brown or pale marks on the skin, lumps, bruising or scarring.

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Last reviewed: September 2019


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