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Hay fever prevention

3-minute read

Reducing your exposure to the substances that cause your hay fever should ease your symptoms. So it’s important to try and find out what substances you are allergic to (the triggers for your hay fever). You can read more about triggers and how to avoid them on the What causes hay fever page.

Try to avoid the triggers as much as you can. These tips may help:

  • Try not to go outside until after midday, especially when the pollen count is high, it’s windy or after thunderstorms. You can check today’s pollen count on Weatherzone (www.weatherzone.com.au), or the pollen forecast.
  • When the pollen count is high, keep windows and doors closed at home and in the car. Consider buying a pollen filter for air vents and use recirculating air-conditioning in the car.
  • If your trigger is grass, avoid mowing, playing or walking in grassy areas, and camping. If you have to do so, wear a mask or take a non-drowsy antihistamine.
  • Wear wraparound sunglasses to stop pollen getting into your eyes when you are outdoors. Rinse your eyes when you get home.
  • Change your clothes and take a shower after being outdoors to remove the pollen on your body.
  • If possible, avoid drying clothes outside. This will help prevent bringing pollen into your house.
  • Avoid fresh flowers if that’s the cause of your symptoms. Consider planting a low-allergen garden around your home and remove any weeds or trees if you are sensitive to them.
  • Damp dust regularly because dusting with a wet cloth, rather than a dry one, will collect the dust and stop any pollen from being spread around.
  • Keep pets out of the house when your symptoms flare up. If your pet does come inside, wash them regularly to remove any allergens from their fur.
  • Don't smoke or let other people smoke in your house. Smoking and breathing in other people's smoke will irritate the lining of your nose, eyes, throat and airways, and can make your symptoms worse. For advice on quitting smoking, visit the Quit Now website.
  • If your hay fever is due to allergens in your workplace, you should advise your employer of this fact so that you can work together to reduce your exposure.

Learn more here about the development and quality assurance of healthdirect content.

Last reviewed: June 2019

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