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Dementia and the home environment

Dementia and the home environment
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The bathroom and dementia

If you care for someone with dementia, then any changes you make to your bathroom and toilet should make those rooms safe and should help the person be as independent as they can for as long as possible.

It's important to respect the person’s privacy as much as possible. You might also have to make it easy to attend to their needs for them.

You might need to label the toilet and bathroom doors, install grab rails by the bath and use non-slip rubber mats. You might also need to lock away toilet cleaning products, personal care products, shavers and hair dryers.

Think about taking any locks off the door so the person with dementia can’t lock themself in, or modifying the toilet door so it can be opened outwards for easy carer access.

Personal comfort is also important. You might consider installing a safe heater in the bathroom to make it more comfortable in winter.

You can find out more by reading the Alzheimer's Australia help sheet about adapting your home.

Last reviewed: January 2017

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