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Osteoporosis Australia

Osteoporosis Australia is a national not-for-profit organisation responsible for providing osteoporosis information and services to the community and health professionals.

Osteoporosis Australia aims to improve awareness about the disease in the Australian community and reduce fractures.

Osteoporosis Australia focuses on the following key objectives:

  • increase awareness throughout Australia and promote better management of osteoporosis
  • encourage prevention
  • improve GP and other health professionals understanding of osteoporosis
  • act as an effective lobby voice in Federal Government
  • fund bone related research.

For support call the national toll-free helpline

(Mon - Fri 10:00am to 4:00 pm except Public Holidays)

  • Ph: 1800 242 141

To assess your bone health and risk of fracture take the Know Your Bones self-assessment

Recommended links

Last reviewed: September 2018

Information from this partner

Found 36 results

What you need to know about Osteoporosis

1.2 million Australians are affected by osteoporosis, which means that their bones are fragile and at risk of fracture. A further 6.3 million people have low bone density (osteopenia), a possible precursor to osteoporosis. However, as many as 4 out of 5 people with osteoporosis don’t know that they have it and therefore don’t know that they are at risk of fracturing a bone. This is because osteoporosis is a ‘silent’ disease without obvious symptoms.

Read more on Osteoporosis Australia website

Vitamin D in pregnancy, infancy, childhood and adolescence

Building strong, healthy bones early in life is the best way to protect yourself from osteoporosis as you get older. Vitamin D has a crucial role in this process. This factsheet is about the importance of vitamin D in pregnancy and early life, the ways in which you can ensure that you, your baby or your child get enough vitamin D, and what to do if you think you or your child is at risk of vitamin D deficiency.

Read more on Osteoporosis Australia website

Coeliac disease and osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a condition in which the bones become fragile, leading to a higher risk of breaks or fractures. A minor bump or fall can be enough to cause a break in someone with osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is one of the most common health problems associated with coeliac disease. This factsheet explains how coeliac disease can affect your bones, how to find out if you are at risk of osteoporosis, and what you can do to help protect your bone health.

Read more on Osteoporosis Australia website

Blokes, Bones and Breaks

Osteoporosis is often seen as a woman’s disease but men suffer too. Around 250,000 men in Australia have osteoporosis and this is expected to increase. Men account for 30% of all fractures that occur in people over 50. Osteoporosis can be prevented and treated. Taking early action is the most effective way of preventing a broken bone.

Read more on Osteoporosis Australia website

Rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a condition in which the bones become fragile, leading to a higher risk of breaks or fractures. A minor bump or fall can be enough to cause a break in someone with osteoporosis. People with rheumatoid arthritis are at increased risk of developing osteoporosis. This factsheet explains how rheumatoid arthritis can affect your bones, how to find out if you are at risk of osteoporosis, and what you can do to help protect your bone health.

Read more on Osteoporosis Australia website

Real men build their strength from within

Appearances can be deceiving. Men who look strong on the outside, may actually be weak on the inside and don’t realise it. Worldwide approximately one in five men over the age of 50 years will break a bone due to osteoporosis. Most are neither identified nor treated for this ‘silent’ disease, even after they’ve had a fracture. Osteoporosis is a disease which gradually weakens bones, leading to painful and debilitating fragility fractures (broken bones). These can occur after a minor fall from standing height, as a result of a bump, sneeze or even from bending over to tie a shoelace. Any bone can break due to osteoporosis, but some of the most serious and common fractures are those of the spine and hip.

Read more on Osteoporosis Australia website

Pregnancy and Osteoporosis

This leaflet is about the rare and sudden occurrence of osteoporosis during pregnancy, usually diagnosed after birth. If you have had a fracture during or after pregnancy, then please speak to your doctor or health care professional. Optimising bone health during pregnancy is also important for those women already diagnosed with low bone density (osteopenia) or osteoporosis.

Read more on Osteoporosis Australia website

Hyperparathyroidism and osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a condition in which the bones become fragile, leading to a higher risk of breaks or fractures. A minor bump or fall can be enough to cause a break in someone with osteoporosis. People with hyperparathyroidism are at increased risk of developing osteoporosis. This fact-sheet explains how hyperparathyroidism can affect your bones, how to find out if you are at risk of osteoporosis, and what you can do to help protect your bone health.

Read more on Osteoporosis Australia website

Osteopenia

Osteopenia is the term used by doctors to describe low bone density. People with osteopenia have bones that are weaker than normal, but not weak enough to be called osteoporosis. Osteopenia or low bone density is thought to affect around 6.3 million Australians, and is an early warning sign that you should be taking action to reduce your risk of developing osteoporosis and breaking a bone in the future.

Read more on Osteoporosis Australia website

Diabetes and osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a condition in which the bones become fragile, leading to a higher risk of breaks or fractures. A minor bump or fall can be enough to cause a break in someone with osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is more common in people with diabetes than in the general population. This fact-sheet explains how diabetes can affect your bones, how to find out if you are at risk of osteoporosis, and what you can do to help protect your bone health.

Read more on Osteoporosis Australia website

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