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Brand name: M-Cite TM

Active ingredients: gemcitabine

What it is used for

Treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. Treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Treatment of patients with Fluorouracil refractory pancreatic cancer. Treatment of patients with bladder cancer, alone or in combination with cisplatin. Treatment, in combination with paclitaxel, of patients with unresectable, locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer who have relapsed following adjuvant/neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Prior chemotherapy should have included an anthracycline unless clinically contraindicated.. Treatment, in combination with carboplatin, of patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian carcinoma, who have relapsed > six months following platinum based therapy.

How to take it

The way to take this medicine is: Intravenous Infusion.

  • Store below 30 degrees Celsius
  • Shelf lifetime is 3 Years.

You should seek medical advice in relation to medicines and use only as directed by a healthcare professional.

Always read the label. If symptoms persist see your healthcare professional.

Visual appearance

White freeze dried powder

Do I need a prescription?

This medicine is available from a pharmacist and requires a prescription. It is Schedule 4 : Prescription Only Medicine.

Pregnant or planning a pregnancy?

For the active ingredient gemcitabine

You should seek advice from your doctor or pharmacist about taking this medicine. They can help you balance the risks and the benefits of this medicine during pregnancy.

Reporting side effects

You can help ensure medicines are safe by reporting the side effects you experience.

You can report side effects to your doctor, or directly at www.tga.gov.au/reporting-problems

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