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Brand name: Levetiracetam (Accord) TM

Active ingredients: levetiracetam

What it is used for

ACCORD LEVETIRACETAM Tablets are indicated for: ò Use in epileptic patients aged 4 years and older, initially as add-on therapy, in the treatment of partial onset seizures with or without secondary generalisation. ò Monotherapy in the treatment of partial onset seizures, with or without secondary generalisation, in patients from 16 years of age with newly diagnosed epilepsy. ò Add-on therapy in the treatment of myoclonic seizures in adults and adolescents from 12 years of age with Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy (JME) and, ò Add-on therapy in the treatment of primary generalised tonic-clonic seizures (PGTC) in adults and children from 4 years of age with idiopathic generalised epilepsy (IGE).

How to take it

You should seek medical advice in relation to medicines and use only as directed by a healthcare professional.

  • The way to take this medicine: Oral
  • Store below 25 degrees Celsius
  • Store in a Dry Place
  • Shelf lifetime is 36 Months.

Always read the label. If symptoms persist see your healthcare professional.

Visual appearance

White to off white, oval biconvex, Film coated tablets, debossed " L 67" with breakline on one side and plain on the other side.

Food interactions

For the active ingredient levetiracetam

  • Take without regard to meals. Food does not affect bioavailabilty.

Do I need a prescription?

This medicine is available from a pharmacist and requires a prescription. It is Schedule 4 : Prescription Only Medicine.

Over 65?

This medicine contains the active ingredients:

If you are over 65 years of age, there may be specific risks and recommendations for use of this medicine. Please discuss your individual circumstances with your pharmacist, doctor or health professional. For more information read our page on medication safety for older people.

Pregnant or planning a pregnancy?

For the active ingredient levetiracetam

You should seek advice from your doctor or pharmacist about taking this medicine. They can help you balance the risks and the benefits of this medicine during pregnancy.

Download leaflet

For side effects, taking other medicines and more

Download consumer medicine information leaflet (pdf) from the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) website

Reporting side effects

You can help ensure medicines are safe by reporting the side effects you experience.

You can report side effects to your doctor, or directly at www.tga.gov.au/reporting-problems

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