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Brand name: Low Dose Aspirin (Chemists' Own) TM

Active ingredients: aspirin

What it is used for

For the treatment of patients with known cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease, as an antiplatelet agent for prophylaxis against acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina, transient ischaemic attack and cerebrovascular accident (stroke).

How to take it

The way to take this medicine is: Oral. This medicine is taken by mouth.

  • Store below 25 degrees Celsius
  • Protect from Light
  • Protect from Moisture
  • Shelf lifetime is 36 Months.

You should seek medical advice in relation to medicines and use only as directed by a healthcare professional.

Always read the label. If symptoms persist see your healthcare professional.

Visual appearance

Pink coloured, heart shaped, biconvex enteric-coated tablets, plain on both sides

Do I need a prescription?

The packs below are available from a pharmacy without prescription. It is Schedule 2 : Pharmacy Medicine.

  • 168 pack

We are unable to tell you if you need a prescription for these medicines. You can ask your pharmacist. This medicine is Not Scheduled.

  • 28 pack
  • 84 pack

Over 65?

This medicine contains the active ingredients:

If you are over 65 years of age, there may be specific risks and recommendations for use of this medicine. Please discuss your individual circumstances with your pharmacist, doctor or health professional. For more information read our page on medication safety for older people.

Pregnant or planning a pregnancy?

For the active ingredient aspirin

You should seek advice from your doctor or pharmacist about taking this medicine. They can help you balance the risks and the benefits of this medicine during pregnancy.

Reporting side effects

You can help ensure medicines are safe by reporting the side effects you experience.

You can report side effects to your doctor, or directly at www.tga.gov.au/reporting-problems

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