Healthdirect Free Australian health advice you can count on.

Medical problem? Call 1800 022 222. If you need urgent medical help, call triple zero immediately

healthdirect Australia is a free service where you can talk to a nurse or doctor who can help you know what to do.

beginning of content

Furnishing and dementia

1-minute read

People living with dementia need furnishings to be as familiar as possible, so if you care for someone who has dementia, you may have to make some changes. Keep in mind that some people with dementia use furnishings for support to help them walk.

It's important to have a strong and comfortable armchair that is easy to get in and out of. It also needs to be easy and safe for family and carers who might need to lift the person in and out of the chair. Ideally, the chair should be waterproof in case of incontinence.

You may need to remove any unstable furniture, such as rocking chairs or chairs on wheels. You may also need to soften or pad sharp edges.

Sharp objects that might cause harm, such as scissors or letter openers, and any precious but breakable ornaments should be removed. You may need to remove or cover wallpaper, curtains or upholstery that displays patterns the person with dementia mistakes for objects or insects.

It's good to display photos, ornaments or other objects that trigger happy memories for the person with dementia.

You can find out more by reading the Dementia Australia help sheet about safety issues.

Learn more here about the development and quality assurance of healthdirect content.

Last reviewed: October 2018


Back To Top

Need more information?

These trusted information partners have more on this topic.

Top results

Safety in and around the home | Dementia Australia

Dementia affects each person differently. However symptoms such as confusion, memory loss and disorientation are usually present, and problems with mobility and co-ordination may also affect safety. It is important that family, carers, friends and health professionals assist the person with dementia to feel and be as secure as possible. 

Read more on Dementia Australia website

Preparing your home | Dementia Australia

Creating a safe and comfortable environment Creating a safe and comfortable home environment, plays an important role in ensuring better quality of life for people with dementia. The fundamental purpose of a dementia friendly home is to compensate for the effects of dementia and to support retained function and skills. Maintenance of quality of life for the individual person with dementia is the desired outcome. The quality of life of people with dementia is expressed through their response to their environment.

Read more on Dementia Australia website

Intimacy and sexual issues | Dementia Australia

The importance of intimacy and sexuality The need for closeness is a very important and natural part of our lives. Intimacy is the giving and receiving of love and affection. It involves caring touch, empathic understanding, comfort in times of need and a feeling of safety in relationships.

Read more on Dementia Australia website

The later stages of dementia | Dementia Australia

People with dementia differ in the rate with which their abilities change. But because dementia is a progressive condition, their abilities will deteriorate. Most people in the later stages of dementia need total care and usually receive this in a residential facility. Some families and carers though do choose to care for the person at home. 

Read more on Dementia Australia website

Spending time with your loved one | Dementia Australia

Visiting Visiting in the later stages of dementia Outings Parting Wanting to go home Support groups Contact us Even after a person with dementia has moved into a residential care facility, many people choose to stay involved with practical caring tasks such as a

Read more on Dementia Australia website

Wandering | Dementia Australia

Families and carers of people with dementia may be faced at some time with the problem of what to do if the person begins to wander. Wandering is quite common amongst people with dementia and can be very worrying for those concerned for their safety and well-being. The person’s failing memory and declining ability to communicate may make it impossible for them to remember or explain the reason they wandered. 

Read more on Dementia Australia website

Activities for people with dementia | Dementia Australia

Each day there are many things that provide us with purpose and pleasure.  For a person with dementia, the need for a good quality of life is not diminished. Abilities can vary greatly depending on a person’s age or their stage of dementia, but keeping involved and active in the things you enjoy is extremely important.

Read more on Dementia Australia website

Depression and dementia | Dementia Australia

What is depression? Depression is usually described as feelings of extreme sadness. It describes both a mood and a syndrome. A depressed mood may be:

Read more on Dementia Australia website

Your feelings | Dementia Australia

When caring for someone with dementia you may have to deal with many different feelings, as the needs of the person with dementia changes over time. You may experience a range of very different and often extreme feelings. This is particularly difficult because as dementia gradually causes the person’s abilities and personality to change the nature of your relationship will also change. There is no simple way to deal with these feelings, but it may help to know that the complex and changeable emotions you feel are completely normal.

Read more on Dementia Australia website

Dental care | Dementia Australia

Care of natural teeth Denture care Dealing with dry mouth Visits to the dentist Poor dental health can affect a person’s comfort, appearance, eating, nutrition, behaviour and general health. Every person with dementia needs an individualised preventive approach to dental care that should ideally begin as soon as dementia is diagnosed.

Read more on Dementia Australia website

Healthdirect 24hr 7 days a week hotline

24 hour health advice you can count on

1800 022 222

Government Accredited with over 140 information partners

We are a government-funded service, providing quality, approved health information and advice

Australian Government, health department logo ACT Government logo New South Wales government, health department logo Northen Territory Government logo Government of South Australia, health department logo Tasmanian government logo Government of Western Australia, health department logo