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Dementia care options - video transcript

There are a number of care options available for people with dementia. People with dementia can have access to help at home, respite care and, as dementia worsens, residential care. Watch the video to find out what type of care is available.

Video transcript

Margaret

Well, we're managing just. We made a pact that we'd look after each other until the end. And I want to. I want to. But I'm - I'm just a bit scared. Anand is up half the night. And of course, I have to be up with him, because he might hurt himself or wander off. And I don't know how long I can keep him safe.

Well, the kids all want to help, but we only see them every couple of weeks. And then there's the pressure of us moving into an aged care facility nearer to them. I do want to see more of them, but this is our home, and this is what Anand is used to. I couldn't make such a big move at this stage. Now what help is available to keep people with dementia out of care and at home?

Professor Susan Kurrle

There are a number of options available to assist with the care of a person with dementia. While they're living at home, there can be help coming into the home such as to help with cleaning or cooking, or perhaps provide some respite care, some babysitting, if you like, for the person with dementia while the carer goes out.

This can gradually increase as the dementia gets a little worse. There's also the option of the person with dementia going out to, say, a day activity centre for a day or week. And this gives them an interesting activity, and it gives their carer a break.

Gradually, as dementia worsens, it may be the person can no longer live at home. And that's when we have to look at options for residential care. If a person has significant problems associated with their dementia, then a dementia-specific residential care facility is probably appropriate. And it's good to look around your local area and see what is available.

A visit from the aged care assessment team to work out eligibility for these various facilities will be very important to do, and your GP can organise this.

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Last reviewed: January 2016

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