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Woman examining breast for lumps.

Woman examining breast for lumps.
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Breast cancer awareness

Knowing what your breasts look and feel like, and checking them regularly, can help you detect when something's wrong. Find out what to look out for, including new lumps and changes in shape.

Be breast aware

Detecting breast cancer early can mean that treatment is more effective. Knowing what your breasts normally feel like will help you be aware of any abnormal changes. Not all changes are a sign of breast cancer. Some women have cysts or thickening of the breast tissue, which is normal.

Learn what your breasts look and feel like. Their appearance and feel can change at different times of the menstrual cycle.

The milk-producing tissue in the breast becomes active in the days before a period starts. Some women find that their breasts feel tender and lumpy at this time, especially near the armpits.  

After a hysterectomy (removal of the womb), the breasts usually show the same monthly changes until the time when your periods would have stopped naturally.

After the menopause, activity in the milk-producing tissue stops. Normal breasts can feel soft, less firm and not lumpy.

Attend routine breast screening if you're 50 or over.

Being breast aware means:

  • knowing what's normal for you
  • looking at your breasts and feeling them
  • knowing what changes to look for
  • reporting any changes without delay
  • attending routine breast screening if you're 50 or over.

Changes in the breast

Be aware of the following changes in your breasts:

  • changes in the outline or shape of the breast, especially those caused by arm movements or by lifting the breast
  • changes in the look or feel of the skin, such as puckering or dimpling
  • discomfort or pain in one breast that is unusual, particularly if it is new and persistent
  • any new lumps, thickening or bumpy areas in one breast or armpit, which differs from the same part of the other breast and armpit
  • nipple discharge that's new for you and not milky
  • bleeding from the nipple
  • moist, red areas on the nipple that don't heal easily
  • any change in nipple position, such as pulled up or pointing differently
  • a rash on or around the nipple.

If you notice any of these changes, see your doctor or specialist as soon as possible.

Help and support

More information can be found at:

Last reviewed: September 2016

Need more information?

These trusted information partners have more on this topic.

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Anxiety and depression are common in women with breast cancer, but they are often overlooked and, therefore, undertreated.

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Sexuality following breast cancer treatment: Breast cancer treatment, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, can have lasting physical and emotional effects on a woman and her family. The issue of sexuality following breast cancer treatment is often neglected, but can have a significant impact on a woman's quality of life.

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