Healthdirect Free Australian health advice you can count on.

Medical problem? Call 1800 022 222. If you need urgent medical help, call triple zero immediately

healthdirect Australia is a free service where you can talk to a nurse or doctor who can help you know what to do.

beginning of content

Brand name: Metformin (AS) TM

Active ingredients: metformin

What it is used for

Treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus in adults, particularly in over weight patients, when dietary management and exercise alone, does not result in adequate glycaemic control. Metformin may be used as initial treatment, or in sulphonylurea failures, either alone or in combination with a sulphonylurea and other oral agents or as adjuvant therapy in insulin dependent diabetes.

How to take it

The way to take this medicine is: Oral. This medicine is taken by mouth.

  • Store below 25 degrees Celsius
  • Shelf lifetime is 3 Years.

You should seek medical advice in relation to medicines and use only as directed by a healthcare professional.

Always read the label. If symptoms persist see your healthcare professional.

Visual appearance

White capsule-shaped, biconvex film-coated tablet with a central breakline on one side.

Do I need a prescription?

This medicine is available from a pharmacist and requires a prescription. It is Schedule 4 : Prescription Only Medicine.

Pregnant or planning a pregnancy?

For the active ingredient metformin

You should seek advice from your doctor or pharmacist about taking this medicine. They can help you balance the risks and the benefits of this medicine during pregnancy.

Reporting side effects

You can help ensure medicines are safe by reporting the side effects you experience.

You can report side effects to your doctor, or directly at www.tga.gov.au/reporting-problems

Back to top back to top

Need more information?

These trusted information partners have more on this topic.

Top results

Tablets

Tablets Medication for type 2 diabetes People with type 2 diabetes are often given medications including insulin to help manager their blood glucose levels

Read more on Diabetes Australia website

Medicines & type 2 diabetes

Type 2 diabetes may be treated with drugs such as metformin, sulfonylureas & insulin. Read about diabetes medicines & how to manage them.

Read more on NPS MedicineWise website

Second steps in managing type 2 diabetes - NPS MedicineWise

It is essential to counsel people on the importance of diet, exercise and a healthy weight for improving control of type 2 diabetes

Read more on Australian Prescriber website

Iodine-containing contrast medium - InsideRadiology

InsideRadiology provides free and easily accessible, accurate, up to date and credible information about medical imaging tests and procedures.

Read more on InsideRadiology website

Don’t rush to crush!

Slow release medicines must never be crushed.

Read more on WA Health website

Polycystic ovary syndrome - MyDr.com.au

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects females in their reproductive years. It may cause irregular periods, excess hair growth and ovarian cysts.

Read more on myDr website

Planning to have a baby | VARTA

Planning ahead If you are thinking about having a baby in future, there are some things you can do to improve your chances. Preconception is the period leading up to getting pregnant. This is a great time for both men and women to focus on ways to improve their health, and increase the chance of pregnancy and having a healthy baby. The earlier you start the conversations about having a baby, the better. Here are some things you and your partner (if any) should start thinking about now: the number of children you would like to have the age at which you would like to have your first and last child improving your health before you try booking a preconception health check with your GP. Your Fertility has practical ideas for how you can improve your preconception health including checklists for men and women. Improving fertility Age is the most important factor affecting a woman’s chance of conceiving.  Female fertility starts to decline around age 30 and after age 35 the monthly chance of conceiving decreases more rapidly. Age can also affect a man’s fertility and the chance of having a healthy baby. Certain lifestyle factors for both men and women also affect the ability to conceive, the health of the pregnancy, and the health of the future baby. A healthy weight, a nutritious diet and regular exercise can significantly boost fertility, as can quitting smoking, stopping drug use and curbing heavy drinking. When you are ready to try for a baby, it is important to know when conception is most likely to happen. In an average cycle of 28 days, ovulation happens on day 14. However, cycle length varies between women, and it is important to note that ovulation occurs earlier in women with shorter cycles and later in women with longer cycles. However, pregnancy is only possible during the five days before ovulation through to the day of ovulation. These six days are the ‘fertile window’ in a woman’s cycle, and reflect the lifespan of sperm (five days) and the lifespan of the egg (24 hours). Your Fertility’s ovulation calculator can help you work out the fertile window. Medical conditions and fertility PCOS Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common hormonal condition affecting up to one in five women of childbearing age. The condition affects two hormones, insulin and testosterone (male-like hormones), which may be produced in higher levels and can impact on fertility. Women with PCOS are prone to irregular menstrual cycles due to absent or infrequent ovulation. While the majority of women with PCOS become pregnant without fertility treatment, they often take longer to fall pregnant and are more likely to need treatment (ovulation induction or IVF) than women without PCOS. Despite this, studies show little difference between the number of children born to women with PCOS than to those without. Conception may sometimes occur as a result of lifestyle modification or after receiving medication to assist with ovulation (ovulation induction) and advice regarding the timing of sex. The most successful way to treat PCOS is by making healthy lifestyle changes. Eating a healthy diet and exercising regularly is the best way to reduce symptoms and increase fertility. If you have difficulty conceiving, your GP may refer you to a specialist clinician. Monash Centre for Health Research and Implementation (MCHRI) has a list of questions that may be helpful. You can find more information and resources about PCOS at Your Fertility, Jean Hailes for Women’s Health and MCHRI. Endometriosis Endometriosis is a condition in which endometrium, the tissue that normally lines the womb (uterus), grows outside the uterus. Endometriosis may cause fibrous scar tissue to form on the uterus. It can also affect the ovaries, fallopian tubes and the bowel. Endometriosis may cause very painful periods and reduce fertility or cause infertility. You can find out more about endometriosis at Jean Hailes for Women’s Health and the Better Health Channel.

Read more on Victorian Assisted Reproductive Treatment Authority website

Everyday illness | Diabetes Victoria

When you are sick your body releases stress hormones to help you fight the illness, infection or stress

Read more on Diabetes Victoria website

Treatments for Peripheral Neuropathy | Diabetes NSW & ACT

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy can lead to burning, stabbing pain or 'pins and needles' in the extremities of your body. This happens generally in the feet and lower legs first but can also be present

Read more on Diabetes NSW and ACT website

Returning unwanted medicinesto pharmacies: prescribing toreduce waste | Australian Prescriber

The Return Unwanted Medicines Project is a free and safe way for consumers to dispose of unwanted medicines at...

Read more on Australian Prescriber website

Healthdirect 24hr 7 days a week hotline

24 hour health advice you can count on

1800 022 222

Government Accredited with over 140 information partners

We are a government-funded service, providing quality, approved health information and advice

Australian Government, health department logo ACT Government logo New South Wales government, health department logo Northen Territory Government logo Government of South Australia, health department logo Tasmanian government logo Victorian government logo Government of Western Australia, health department logo