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Brand name: M-M-R II TM

Listen to the Pronunciation:

Active ingredients: measles + mumps + rubella live vaccine

What it is used for

M-M-R II is indicated for simultaneous immunisation against measles, mumps and rubella.,Refer to the NHMRC Australian Immunisation Handbook (AIH) for vaccination recommendations and schedule.,There is some evidence to suggest that infants immunised against measles at less than 12 months of age, or who are born to mothers who had wild-type measles and who are vaccinated at less than one year of age may not develop sustained antibody levels when later revaccinated. The advantage of early protection must be weighed against the chance for failure to respond adequately on reimmunisation.,Infants who are less than 12 months of age may fail to respond to one or more components of the vaccine due to presence in the circulation of residual antibodies of maternal origin, the younger the infant, the lower the likelihood of seroconversion. In geographically isolated or other relatively inaccessible populations for whom immunisation programmes are logistically difficult, and in population groups in which wild-type measles infections may occur in a significant proportion of infants before 15 months of age, it may be desirable to give the vaccine to infants at an earlier age. Infants vaccinated under these conditions at less than 12 months of age should be revaccinated after reaching 12 to 15 months of age.,Previously unvaccinated children older than 12 months who are in contact with susceptible pregnant women should receive live attenuated rubella vaccine to reduce the risk of exposure of the pregnant woman.,Non-Pregnant Adolescent and Adult Females: Immunisation of susceptible non-pregnant adolescent and adult females of childbearing age with live attenuated rubella virus vaccine is indicated if certain precautions are observed (See 4.4 Special Warnings and Precautions for Use and 4.6 Fertility, Pregnancy and Lactation). Vaccinating susceptible postpubertal females confers individual protection against subsequently acquiring rubella infection during pregnancy, which in turn prevents infection of the foetus and consequent congenital rubella injury. Congenital malformations do occur in up to seven percent of all live births, and their chance appearance after vaccination should be borne in mind.,Women of childbearing age should be advised not to become pregnant for one month after vaccination against rubella (which is included in M-M-R II) and should be informed of the reasons for this precaution (See 4.6 Fertility, Pregnancy and Lactation, Use in Pregnancy).,The Australian Immunisation Handbook recommends that effort should be made to identify and immunise non-pregnant seronegative women of child-bearing age.,Women of childbearing age who are potential candidates for vaccination can have serologic tests to determine susceptibility to rubella. However, rubella vaccination of a woman who is not known to be pregnant and has no history of vaccination is justifiable without serologic testing. Please refer to AIH for recommendations for further information regarding serological testing for immunity to rubella.,Postpubertal females should be informed of the frequent occurrence of generally self-limited arthralgia and/or arthritis beginning 2 to 4 weeks after vaccination against rubella (see 4.8 Adverse Effects (Undesirable Effects)).,Post-Partum Women It has been found convenient in many instances to vaccinate rubella-susceptible women in the immediate postpartum period using an appropriate rubella-containing vaccine. (See 4.6 Fertility, Pregnancy and Lactation, Use in Lactation).,Revaccination Children vaccinated when younger than 12 months of age should be revaccinated at 12 to 15 months of age. Persons who were vaccinated originally when 12 months of age or older should be revaccinated with a MMR-containing vaccine, as per the recommended vaccination schedule. Revaccination is intended to seroconvert those who did not respond to the first dose. However, data on long term persistence of antibodies are limited and continued surveillance will be required to allow firm recommendations to be made on revaccination. However, persons should be revaccinated if there is evidence to suggest that initial immunisation was ineffective.

How to take it

This medicine is a pack that contains more than one part.

Part 1: Injection, powder for

Lyophilised powder

The way to take this medicine is: Subcutaneous. This medicine is injected, usually with a short needle or pen-like device, into the fat just beneath the skin.

Part 2: Diluent, not applicable

Clear colourless solution

The way to take this medicine is: Subcutaneous. This medicine is injected, usually with a short needle or pen-like device, into the fat just beneath the skin.

You should seek medical advice in relation to medicines and use only as directed by a healthcare professional.

Always read the label. If symptoms persist see your healthcare professional.

Storage instructions

  • Store at 2 to 8 degrees Celsius
  • Shelf lifetime is 2 Years.

Do I need a prescription?

This medicine is available from a pharmacist and requires a prescription. It is Schedule 4 : Prescription Only Medicine.

Pregnant or planning a pregnancy?

For the active ingredient measles + mumps + rubella live vaccine

You should seek advice from your doctor or pharmacist about taking this medicine. They can help you balance the risks and the benefits of this medicine during pregnancy.

Consumer Medicines Information (CMI)

For side effects, taking other medicines and more

Print the CMI.

Listen to the CMI.


Reporting side effects

You can help ensure medicines are safe by reporting the side effects you experience.

You can report side effects to your doctor, or directly at www.tga.gov.au/reporting-problems

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