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Brand name: Valium TM

Active ingredients: diazepam

What it is used for

Valium is indicated for the management of anxiety disorders or for the short term relief of the symptoms of anxiety. Anxiety or tension associated with the stress of everyday life usually does not require treatment with an anxiolytic. In acute alcohol withdrawal, VALIUM may be useful in the symptomatic relief of acute agitation, tremor, impending or acute delirium tremens and hallucinosis. VALIUM is a useful adjunct for the relief of reflex muscle spasm due to local trauma (injury, inflammation) to muscles, bones and joints. It can also be used to combat spasticity due to upper motor neuron lesions such as cerebral palsy and paraplegia, as well as in athetosis and stiff-man syndrome. Intravenous VALIUM is useful in controlling status epilepticus and the spasms of tetanus

How to take it

You should seek medical advice in relation to medicines and use only as directed by a healthcare professional.

  • The way to take this medicine: Oral
  • Store below 30 degrees Celsius
  • Lifetime is 5 Years.

Always read the label. If symptoms persist see your healthcare professional.

Visual appearance

Cylindrical, biplanar, yellow tablet, upper face marked ROCHE 5, lower face scored.

Images are the copyright of the Pharmacy Guild of Australia

Do I need a prescription?

This medicine is available from a pharmacist and requires a prescription. It is Schedule 4 : Prescription Only Medicine.

Over 65?

This medicine contains the active ingredients:

If you are over 65 years of age, there may be specific risks and recommendations for use of this medicine. Please discuss your individual circumstances with your pharmacist, doctor or health professional. For more information read our page on medication safety for older people.

Pregnant or planning a pregnancy?

For the active ingredient diazepam

You should seek advice from your doctor or pharmacist about taking this medicine. They can help you balance the risks and the benefits of this medicine during pregnancy.

Download leaflet

For side effects, taking other medicines and more

Download consumer medicine information leaflet (pdf)

Disclaimer

The information about this medicine comes from trusted sources.

  • Therapeutic Good's Administration (TGA)
  • Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS)
  • GuildLink
  • DrugBank

healthdirect medicines information is not intended for use in an emergency. If you are suffering an acute illness, overdose, or emergency condition, call triple zero (000) and ask for an ambulance.

Reasonable care has been taken to provide accurate information at the time of creation. This information is not intended to substitute medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be exclusively relied on to manage or diagnose a medical condition. Please refer to our terms and conditions.

See also

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