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Brand name: B-Patch TM

Active ingredients: buprenorphine

What it is used for

B-PATCH patches are Indicated for the management of severe pain where: - other treatment options have failed, are contraindicated, not tolerated or are otherwise inappropriate to provide sufficient management of pain, and - the pain is opioid-responsive, and - requires daily, continuous, long-term treatment,B-PATCH patches are not indicated for use in chronic non-cancer pain other than in exception circumstances. B-PATCH patches are not indicated as an as-needed (PRN) analgesia.

How to take it

The way to take this medicine is: Transdermal.

  • Store below 25 degrees Celsius
  • Shelf lifetime is 12 Months.

You should seek medical advice in relation to medicines and use only as directed by a healthcare professional.

Always read the label. If symptoms persist see your healthcare professional.

Visual appearance

A rectangular patch with rounded edges, beige coloured backing web imprinted with name and respective strength, transparent adhesive matrix lamina

Do I need a prescription?

This medicine requires authorisation for prescription from your doctor. It is Schedule 8 : Controlled Drug.

Pregnant or planning a pregnancy?

For the active ingredient buprenorphine

You should seek advice from your doctor or pharmacist about taking this medicine. They can help you balance the risks and the benefits of this medicine during pregnancy.

Reporting side effects

You can help ensure medicines are safe by reporting the side effects you experience.

You can report side effects to your doctor, or directly at www.tga.gov.au/reporting-problems

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