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Follicle stimulating hormone

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Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) is produced by the pituitary gland in the brain. It is an important hormone for normal functioning of the reproductive system in men and women.

In women, FSH helps control the menstrual cycle and the production of eggs by the ovaries. The amount of FSH varies throughout a woman's menstrual cycle and is highest just before she releases an egg (ovulates).

In men, FSH helps control the production of sperm and the amount of FSH in men normally remains stable after puberty.

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Last reviewed: August 2020


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Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) - Pathology Tests Explained

Why and when to get tested for FSH

Read more on Pathology Tests Explained website

Pituitary Gland - Hormones Australia

What hormones are produced by the pituitary gland? The pituitary gland produces a range of hormones, including adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), growth hormone (GH), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinising hormone (LH) and prolactin.

Read more on Hormones Australia website

Fertility explained | VARTA

Fertility is the ability to conceive a child. Most of us take our fertility for granted but the process of reproduction is complex, so some people may experience difficulties when trying for a baby. There are a range of factors that can affect fertility. Taking care of your preconception health by modifying your lifestyle can improve your chance of a pregnancy and the health of your future child. Medical conditions such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and endometriosis can reduce fertility, however it may just take longer to get pregnant. In some cases, medical procedures can be used to preserve fertility. Fertility preservation (freezing of gametes for later use) is used by people who are not ready to have a baby during their most fertile years or for those facing medical treatment that might impair their fertility. Understanding reproduction It is useful to understand how eggs and sperm are normally formed, and how conception occurs to understand the causes of infertility and how they are targeted in fertility treatment. The hormones which control the production of sperm and eggs are called gonadotrophins. There are two types of gonadotrophins: follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinising hormone (LH). In men, they stimulate the testicles to produce sperm and testosterone. In women, they act on the ovaries where the eggs develop. The female sex hormones, oestrogen and progesterone, are produced by the ovaries when eggs mature and are released (ovulation).   For women, the production of sex hormones and the release of an egg is known as the menstrual cycle. It is counted from the first day of the period until the day before the start of the next period. In an average cycle of 28 days, ovulation happens on day 14. However, cycle length varies between women, and it is important to note that ovulation occurs earlier in women with shorter cycles and later in women with longer cycles. Sperm are produced at the rate of about 300 million per day. They take some 80 days to mature. Each sperm has a head, which contains the genetic material, and a tail, which propels it up through the vagina, uterus, and fallopian tubes where the egg is fertilised. Conception occurs when an egg and a sperm come together. At ovulation, an egg is released from the ovary into the fallopian tube. If sperm is present at that time, the egg can be fertilised. The fertilised egg then starts to divide and becomes an embryo. After ovulation, the ovary produces progesterone which prepares the lining of the uterus - the endometrium - for the growing embryo. A few days after implantation, the embryo starts to produce human chorionic gonadotrophins (HCG) - the hormone that gives a positive pregnancy test reading. If an embryo does not form or attach to the endometrium (implantation), the level of progesterone drops and the next period starts.

Read more on Victorian Assisted Reproductive Treatment Authority website

Luteinising hormone (LH) - Pathology Tests Explained

Why and when to get tested for LH

Read more on Pathology Tests Explained website

Ovaries - Hormones Australia

Ovaries produce and release eggs (ova) and make the hormones estrogen, progesterone and some testosterone. These hormones regulate the menstrual cycle and protect bone health.

Read more on Hormones Australia website

1 week pregnant: Key points

A quick summary of the changes to mum’s body, the baby to be, medical appointments and lifestyle information for both mum and dad.

Read more on Parenthub website

Infertility treatment | Jean Hailes

There are many reasons a woman may have difficulty becoming pregnant. There are a number of things you can do to increase the likelihood of becoming pregnant including lifestyle changes, surgery, hormone treatment and Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART).

Read more on Jean Hailes for Women's Health website

Puberty (male) | HealthEngine Blog

In boys, maturation of the reproductive organs causes puberty symptoms like increased penis size, sperm production, deepening voice and chest hair growth.

Read more on HealthEngine website

Pituitary tumour - Better Health Channel

betterhealth.vic.gov.au

Read more on Better Health Channel website

How pathology helps IVF parents get pregnant | Know Pathology Know Healthcare

For IVF parents, pathology testing is vital from fertility tests before conception to ensuring a healthy pregnancy

Read more on Know Pathology Know Healthcare website

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