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Craniosynostosis

3-minute read

Craniosynostosis occurs when one or more of the seams (called sutures) between the bones in a newborn baby's skull close too early. It is rare – affecting about 1 in 3,000 babies – and can be treated successfully.

What is craniosynostosis?

The skull is made up of flat, plate-like bones that protect the brain. The gaps between each bone are called sutures. There are 4 sutures in a baby's skull.

Usually, the sutures stay open while the baby's brain grows and the child develops. The sutures eventually fuse together when the baby is about 2 years old.

In children with craniosynostosis, the sutures close and the bones fuse too early, which doesn't leave the brain with enough room to grow. The developing brain presses against the skull, causing the baby's head to be pushed out of shape.

In some cases, the skull compresses the brain and can cause problems with eyesight, hearing and intellectual development.

Signs and symptoms of craniosynostosis

The signs that your baby might have craniosynostosis include:

  • an unevenly shaped head at birth or soon after
  • abnormal growth and shape of the baby's head
  • an abnormal or missing fontanel (the soft triangle on the top of a baby's head)
  • raised ridges along the sutures of a baby's head

What causes craniosynostosis?

It is not clear why some babies have craniosynostosis. It can be a feature of many different genetic syndromes including Apert syndrome, Carpenter syndrome, Crouzon syndrome, Pfeiffer syndrome and Saethre-Chotzen syndrome.

But other babies with craniosynostosis do not have a genetic syndrome, and there is no obvious cause.

Diagnosis of craniosynostosis

Although craniosynostosis can be identified before a baby is born during a routine ultrasound, it is normally diagnosed in the first few weeks of a baby's life.

A doctor will examine your baby's head thoroughly and measure it, and will check for any other conditions that could affect the baby's health. Your baby may have x-rays or CT scans to help confirm the diagnosis.

They may have blood or other samples taken for genetic testing.

It's important to detect the condition early to start treatment as soon as possible, so the brain can grow normally.

How is craniosynostosis treated?

Surgery opens up the bones and allows the skull to grow into a more typical shape. This enables the brain to grow and develop.

Surgery for craniosynostosis is usually performed when a child is between 3 months and 12 months old. In rare cases, a child will need further surgery when they're a little older.

Your child will need to see the doctors regularly after surgery, to monitor both their skull and their development.

Where to go for support

You will most likely need help and support while your child is going through craniosynostosis. The hospital should be able to help, and you can talk to a child and maternal nurse at healthdirect on 1800 022 222.

You can also get support from beyondblue website or on 1300 22 4636.

Learn more here about the development and quality assurance of healthdirect content.

Last reviewed: June 2019

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