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Hernia types

There are a number of different types of hernia, including:

  • Hiatus hernia, occurs when part of the stomach pushes up into the chest through the opening in the diaphragm (layer of muscle separating the stomach from the chest) where the oesophagus passes through.
  • Inguinal hernia, occurs when the bowel or other abdominal tissue pushes through the abdominal wall muscle near the inguinal canal (a canal through a ligament in the area of the groin). These are more common in men.
  • Umbilical hernia, occurs when the bowel or abdominal tissue pushes through the abdominal wall muscle near the belly button (naval). These are more common in newborns.
  • Incisional hernia, occurs when the bowel or other abdominal tissue pushes through a weakened spot in the abdominal wall muscle where previous surgery or trauma has occurred.
  • Femoral hernias, occurs when the bowel or other abdominal tissue pushes through the abdominal wall at the femoral canal (a canal through a ligament in the area where the leg joins the body). These are more common in women.
  • Epigastric hernias, occurs when the abdominal fat pushes through the abdominal wall muscle between the naval and below the rib cage.

Last reviewed: May 2015

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Hiatus hernia: diagnosis and treatment - myDr.com.au

Hiatus hernia is often diagnosed when doctors investigate reflux with an endoscopy or barium X-ray. The hiatus hernia can show up as a bulge positioned between the oesophagus and your stomach.

Read more on myDr website

Hiatus hernia symptoms

Most hiatus hernias don't cause any symptoms. When symptoms do occur, the most common are heartburn and regurgitation of stomach acid into the mouth.

Read more on myDr website

Hernia

A hernia is the protrusion of organs, such as intestines, through a weakened section of the abdominal wall.

Read more on Queensland Health website

Hernia | myVMC

Hernias such and inguinal or abdominal occur when an organ or structure passes through an abnormal opening and ends up in the wrong place.

Read more on myVMC – Virtual Medical Centre website

Gaviscon Double Strength | myVMC

Gaviscon Double Strength is used for relief of symptoms caused by reflux of gastric contents in heartburn, dyspepsia, reflux oesophagitis and hiatus hernia.

Read more on myVMC – Virtual Medical Centre website

Hernias | Better Health Channel

Read more on Better Health Channel website

Hernia - Inguinal | The Sydney Children's Hospitals Network

Read more on Sydney Children's Hospitals Network website

Hernia - Umbilical | The Sydney Children's Hospitals Network

Read more on Sydney Children's Hospitals Network website

Parenting and Child Health - Health Topics - Umbilical care and umbilical hernia

After the cord is cut at birth, your baby will be left with a short stump of cord attached to the umbilicus.(Other words for umbilicus are navel, tummy button orbelly button.)

Read more on Women's and Children's Health Network website

Gaviscon | myVMC

Gaviscon is an antacid used for symptomatic relief of heartburn, dyspepsia, reflux oesophagitis and hiatus hernia. It is called an anti-reflux agent.

Read more on myVMC – Virtual Medical Centre website

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